Because it's not about left or right, it's about right or wrong.

“I follow back” trend on Twitter/Parler/Minds/Gab punishes new content creators, reveals consequences of our addiction to social media.

When I chose to study history and politics, I did so with a defined purpose. At the time, I wanted to be a lawyer to “be the change I wanted to see in the world.” After seeing the corruption and immoral structure of the judicial system firsthand, I realized that teaching might be a better alternative. I felt that their needs to be a philosophical revolution before there could be a legal one. After completing my Bachelor of Arts in History at Metropolitan State University of Denver, I sadly discovered that the philosophical battle could not be won in a public classroom with a state-mandated curriculum, that I felt was based on pure fiction. Then, I realized that I could make a difference in other ways.

It was at this time that The Conservatarian Press was born. It is my goal as a historian to leave you with something that you can take with you. A new tool, if you will. That is why I am currently writing my first book, Californication: The Rise of the American Technocracy. I also felt that this book needed to be delivered in a way that allowed for further future discussions, which is why I regularly write articles that I feel are important. As an amateur historian (a B.A. in History is just enough to teach high school), there are certain characteristics of a society that I feel are important to maintaining civility. Obviously, I believe these characteristics uphold certain values based in natural law, which happen to follow the values of the conservatarian political ideology.

I firmly believe that my life experience and educational background are unique and valuable. I am not the average political follower/fan. I am not participating from the bleachers, I am working on the field. At one point in time, this was a career choice for me. So, when working to build the momentum of this site, it has been a tiresome, frustrating, disheartening, enlightening and uplifting experience. Yet, the most frustrating experience for me has been my attempt to build my site through the use of social media. Of course, the censorship from the likes of Facebook and Twitter was a huge roadblock for me. However, the largest obstruction towards building my following has been from the potential followers themselves.

The censorship from Facebook and Twitter and manipulative algorithms have forced conservative users to “follow back” anyone that follows them, so that their posts are presumably included in their feeds (although I have suspicions Twitter and FB are working hard to find ways to limit feed accessibility in this area, too.) The problem with this reaction has been the cancerous growth of users selfishly following each other only to artificially increase their follower count. In other words, we are not following each other because we are actually interested. We are following each other because we want attention in return, which can create problems for content creators trying to get their feet wet. This is indicative of the overall trend of people being chemically addicted to likes and follows, as Simon Sinek has admirably pointed out:

 

I have been attacked by users for pointing out that only “blue check marked” “gold-starred” or “green check-marked” are getting a decent following, with a de facto monopoly on profile post traffic. Other content creators end up having to follow people like a mad man on the keyboard to obtain followers. Is this by design, for certain popular or famous users to maintain dominance over the site, thereby maintaining a certain status-quo? This is a topic for another day. However, it is clear that this structure is forcing users to artificially follow each other, creating artificial relationships, consumer bases, etc. If you ever want to experiment with how much your users care about your posts, unfollow them.

As content creators, it is not our job to follow our audience members. WE are the creators. If you want to become a creator yourself, you can take the time to design your own website and theme. You can take the time to design your own artwork, and write your own articles. You can invest the money in funding your website maintenance, and obtain a domain name. No? Not for you? Than stick to following those that do create, or those that you are simply interested in. That is your choice as a consumer. As a creator, I do not need to make you a de facto business partner by agreeing to share your posts. This is a free-market, either you like my articles and books, or you don’t. Relationships without value are meaningless. You will find this out, as soon as you decide not to follow someone simply because they don’t follow you back.

The end result? We have become headline readers. We do not always take the time to read articles or read books. We follow each other for no reason other than to hopefully receive more attention ourselves. We focus on what is expedient, trendy, or outrageous rather than something that is humble, accurate, and honest. Will things change? I hope so. If you’ve made it through this entire article, than I’d say we have a chance.

2 Responses to ““I follow back” trend on Twitter/Parler/Minds/Gab punishes new content creators, reveals consequences of our addiction to social media.”

  1. GAB and GAB users regularly attack the Conservatarian Press…Have liberal actors/bots infiltrated the site? Here is how the social media site is fostering hate and punishing creators. | The Conservatarian Press

    […] Many Republicans and conservatives attack other Republicans and conservatives for no reason at all. As I’ve pointed out in other pieces, Americans and humans in general have a hard time accepting criticism. It has definitely gotten worse over the years with the rise of political correctness.  My experience as a writer/creator/author on GAB has been absolutely terrible, for multiple reasons. The toughest criticism I have for GAB is the level of visceral hatred I receive in the multiple attempts I’ve made to create a following on the social media site. I respect the first amendment and everyone’s right to an opinion. However, I firmly believe the reason that these attacks are more common than anywhere else is due to the fact that the site may be infected with fake accounts and users. Infowars’ Millie Weaver reported on the fact that Democrat organizations actually pay people to pose as conservatives on social media, in order to plant seeds of disruption. It would make sense that they are infiltrating these new sites in order to insure their eventual demise. Furthermore, I believe the that due to a low-user base, users have had to “follow-back” each other to gain a following, which leads to artificia… […]

    Like

    Reply
  2. GAB and GAB users regularly attack the Conservatarian Press…Have liberal actors/bots infiltrated the site? Here is how the social media site is fostering hate and punishing creators. | The Conservatarian Press

    […] Many Republicans and conservatives attack other Republicans and conservatives for no reason at all. As I’ve pointed out in other pieces, Americans and humans in general have a hard time accepting criticism. It has definitely gotten worse over the years with the rise of political correctness.  My experience as a writer/creator/author on GAB has been absolutely terrible, for multiple reasons. The toughest criticism I have for GAB is the level of visceral hatred I receive in the multiple attempts I’ve made to create a following on the social media site. I respect the first amendment and everyone’s right to an opinion. However, I firmly believe the reason that these attacks are more common than anywhere else is due to the fact that the site may be infected with fake accounts and users. Democrat organizations have been caught paying groups to pose as conservatives (or Russians) on social media, in order to plant seeds of disruption. It would make sense that they are infiltrating these new sites in order to insure their eventual demise. Furthermore, I believe the that due to a low-user base, users have had to “follow-back” each other to gain a following, which leads to artificia… […]

    Like

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

Basic HTML is allowed. Your email address will not be published.

Subscribe to this comment feed via RSS

%d bloggers like this: